What's Happening

There are an estimated 4.5 million Daybreak honey bees buzzing around our neighborhoods. Less than 25% of Daybreak is currently developed, which leaves plenty of open fields to support the honey bee population that arrive in hives each spring and are attended to by professional apiarists.  The hope is that the bees will thrive in an environment where they can pollinate the flowers in the yards, buzz through the parks and along the trails, and visit the blossoms on the trees and vegetables in the community gardens and adjacent family farms. We adore our little pollinators!
Daybreak Honey Bees
However, a recent report from the Center for Biological Diversity evaluated more than 1,400 native North American bee species and found that more than half of the species evaluated are on the decline with almost a quarter at risk for extinction. Bees play a crucial role in our ecosystem. According to the report one out of every three bites of food relies on pollination from bees. What’s impacting the native bee population? Mainly habitat destruction and pesticide use.
Here’s what Daybreak residents can do to help Daybreak honey bees: plant a variety of native bee friendly flowers in your yard, don’t use any pesticides, buy real local honey, grow a vegetable garden, and don’t exterminate bees.
If you are interested in growing a vegetable garden, there are six community gardens that encompass more than 347 garden plots throughout the Daybreak community. Residents interested in renting a garden plot for the 2017 season can contact the Daybreak Community Association at 801-254-8062.
Daybreak Honey Bees
If you haven’t tried Daybreak honey, pick-up a jar or two at the local bakery, Swirly Girls.
Daybreak Honey Bees
Our honey is sold raw, which is unpasteurized and doesn’t contain additional water. Raw honey has a vast array of health benefits because it maintains all the natural vitamins, enzymes and active phytonutrients. Read more about the health benefits of Daybreak honey.