What's Happening

Could living in a walkable community help offset mental decline in seniors? Research conducted at the University of Kansas discovered that communities with places of interest close to home–such as parks, restaurants, shops & community gardens–motivate walking and can help stem mental decline.
Daybreak -KLC 5-2010
“Easy-to-walk communities result in better outcomes both for physical health–such as lower body mass and blood pressure–and cognition (such as memory),” according to Amber Watts, assistant professor of clinical psychology at the University of Kansas.  The study tracked 25 people with mild Alzheimer’s disease and 39 older adults without cognitive problems over two years.

daybreak fall 2006
Building a safe, walkable community is a key building block of the Daybreak masterplan.   In Daybreak the homes are mixed right in with all sorts of things that make life simpler and more flavorful. Community gardens and good schools. Places to shop. Restaurants, offices, swimming pools, tennis courts, sports fields, parks, parks and more parks. All connected by 30+ miles of walking/biking trails. And in the middle, a 67-acre freshwater lake. The result? A unique way of living that includes less driving and more walking, more socializing, a healthier lifestyle with increased cognitive health, more fresh air and (if you’re a community gardener) more fresh vegetables.
SD Project for Kennecott Land Co
For those looking to retire in Utah, Daybreak has an exclusive village just for people age 55+–Garden Park. The village is designed to give residents less work and more free time. With a variety of amenities like parks, restaurants and shopping within a short walk or easy bike ride from home. Garden Park itself was also recently voted as one of the 50 best places to retire by Where to Retire magazine
Come see for yourself why more than 11,000 residents have called Daybreak home for the last 10 years.